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Top 5 winter dog breeds


November 28, 2011
Peter

Chihuahua

Source

While most dogs, like us humans, prefer a warm climate, some of them thrive in cold weather and definitely don’t need to be dressed in winter. In this post, we are introducing 5 dog breeds that we think are best suited for cold climates.

1. Siberian Husky

Our number one breed must be the Siberian Husky, a dog made for enduring cold weather and harsh conditions. Huskies were bred in Northeastern Asia to pull heavy loads over long distances, which made them indispensable to their people. Admiral Robert peary for instance trusted Huskies with his life in search for the North pole in the early 20th century. Siberian Huskies are beautiful dogs, sporting a dense double coat and a peculiar pair of eyes in ice blue, dark blue, amber or brown colour. Heterochromia is quite common among Huskies, so don’t be surprised if you come across with a brown and blue eyed specimen. The Husky is a very intelligent and agile dog, which makes it the perfect candidate for obedience trials and sled-racing. Although a pair of glowing, ice blue eyes might seem irresistible to some potential owners, we only recommend the Siberian Husky to people who can provide the dog with lots of mental and physical stimulation.

2. Alaskan Malamute

Second on our list is the Alaskan Malamute, which is just as good at enduring cold weather as the Husky, but its working abilities are limited to pulling heavy loads over shorter distances. If you were looking to get an Alaskan Malamute as a pet dog, you should be aware that they are one of the most difficult breeds to train. Over the centuries of living in the harshest environments, they had to rely on their intelligence and resourcefulness to survive and are not so keen to obey orders. At the same time, Malamutes are particularly fond of people, which makes them great family pets, even if they get stubborn at times.

3. Bernese Mountain Dog

The only European breed on our list is the Bernese Mountain Dog. It is a heavy dog with a distinctive tricolor coat and a white “Swiss cross” on the chest. Berners have historically been used for guarding property and herding stock in the Swiss Alps, but today they are mostly sought for their friendly nature and good companion qualities. This easy going and kind hearted breed is recommended to any family with children, provided that they are prepared for loosing their pet in only 7 years, which is the average life expectancy of the Bernese Mountain Dog.

4. Akita Inu

The Japanese Akita is another great choice for a cold climate. A large and powerful dog, it is not recommended for the first time dog owner. However, they make perfect family pets: the breed is supposed to have a natural affinity with children, just like retrievers have one with sticks and balls. The best way to illustrate the Akita’s devotion and loyalty to its family is the story of Hachiko. Hachiko used to accompany his master to the train station every day and come back to meet him again in the afternoon. One day the master never came, but Hachiko waited and returned every day for the rest of his life.

5. Chow Chow

If you are looking to have a somewhat smaller dog, who still doesn’t need to be dressed in winter, the Chow Chow may be your best bet. Its dense double coat protects it from the coldest weather and gives it the look of a lion, which is probably why the Chinese call it Songshi Quan, literally meaning “puffy-lion dog”. Being extremely protective of their territory, Chow Chows make perfect guard and watch dogs, but may not be appropriate for the first time dog owner.

Many other dog breeds will do just fine in cold weather, but with the ones on this list, you’ll definitely save the money you’d spend on your Chihuahua’s winter wardrobe. 

Catgegory: Dog Facts

Anti -Barking Dog Collars Versus Non Barking Dogs… ( Part 2 )


July 12, 2010
ann

Earlier this week, I tackled the topic of anti-barking dog collars; what they are; and how effective they are. I would like to continue with the topic a bit.

Although I briefly mentioned which breeds are the quiet representatives, I would like to continue with this thread. This is also an important factor when choosing a dog or a puppy. The amount of barking depends on three things: Firstly, the environment in which the dog lives influences his behaviour. Secondly it is genetic. Some dog breeds have been bred to be more quiet than others. Thirdly, canine physiology also holds answers. The Basenji breed for instance…ancient as it is, originates from Africa, and it has under-developed vocal cords. It cannot bark, because of a shallow larynx. It can give out sounds like yoddeling though. Some other more quiet breeds include:

-Golden Retrievers
-Newfoundland dogs
-Boxers
-Alaskan Malamutes
-Saint Bernards
-Bulldogs
-Collies
-Afghans

Of course they do bark, but in moderation. Dogs that are big barkers have well-developed vocal cords. New dog owners often don’t consider both training and dog breeds when selecting a dog and this can result in problems due to barking.
Barking Dogs and anti-barking dog collars

If you have done your research before buying a dog, good for you! An anti-barking dog collar is not needed if you are an owner of a quiet breed. Research into choosing a dog is imperative. However, if you are a loving owner of a rather roudy dog, then you may just have a problem there and an anti-barking dog collar in this case is a great possibility and solution. According to dog trainer and author; Ty Brown: ” I get tired of people who don’t do research and call these collars mean and cruel without realizing how humane they can be when used right. ” With an anti-barking dog collar, slowly but surely, your roudy dog can become a quiet pet as well; much like the other non-barking dog breeds.

Please do bear in mind that puppies tend to be more enthusiastic and loud. A lot depends on the individual personality of your dog as well. If your dog has spent his early weeks among very enthusiastic barking dogs, don’t expect him to be silent, no matter what the dog breed is. Regardless of which dog breed you end up choosing, don’t overlook the importance of good training. Good training – although often requiring extreme patience and professional help; combined with an anti-barking dog collar- will ensure a happy home environment for both dog and owner. Silence is Golden. Start with an anti-barking dog collar.

Catgegory: Dog Tips

Anti-Barking Dog Collars Versus Non Barking Dogs…( Part 1)


ann

All dogs bark. Is that true? Well no. Not all dogs bark, but most do. Owners of a Basenji, an Alaskan Malamute, and an Afghan Hound can take it easy and enjoy the silence around them. However there are dogs that are typically big barkers and these include the Jack Russell, Yorkshire Terrier, Maltese, Mudi, Vizsla, Shetland Dog, Newfoundland, German Shepherd, Dachshund, Beagle, West-Highland Terrier, Toy Poodle, Doberman and the Schnauzer.

So what to do when you have to listen to incessant barking? Not only your sleep, but your neighbors’ nerves will also be affected. Although one understands that barking is natural for dogs, there comes a time when enough is enough. What to do then? Training might help…but an anti-barking dog collar might do the trick as well.

What is an anti-barking dog collar you ask? Well this is special type of collar that triggers a reaction out of a dog…and after repetitively negatively stimulating the dog with every bark, the dog slowly but surely learns not to bark. There are different types of anti bark collars available. There are dog collars that deliver a light shock to your dog as a reaction to barking. There is also a type of dog collar that sprays mists of citronella. This smell is not welcomed by dogs and they sooner stop barking than continue smelling the fumes of citronella around them. This is a more humane solution because it does not inflict pain to the dog.

Anti-Barking Collar for Dogs

So how effective is an anti barking dog collar, you ask?
– Anti-barking collars can modify a dog’s behavior while teaching the dog not to bark.
– It helps dog owners in their everyday chores of taking care of their dogs.
– It is humane and the most proper way to stop excessive barking of dogs. Dog owners support it worldwide.
– In a matter of a week, it can already be removed since dogs already get used to such a scheme.
– There are some anti-barking collars which are rechargeable so there will be no extra costs for batteries.
– There are some anti-barking collars which are waterproof which means dogs can use this device even when it’s raining outside.

As with every type of collar, it is important to choose the right type for your dog. This should of course depend on the size of your dog as well as their barking habit. You should buy a small, thin, delicate collar for small dogs, while thicker, stronger collars are the best option for large-bodied dogs. The fitting of the collar is very important! You don’t under any circumstances want to buy a collar that is too tight, since this may lead to choking!

If you are thinking of buying online…look at their return policy. This will help you in case the collar is too big, or too small for your dog. If you are aiming to buy it at a pet store, they may be kind enough to give you advice about the type and effectiveness of the collar that is perfect for your dog. So try it out. You might just catch up on a few hours of lost sleep!

Catgegory: Dog Tips