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Popular Paws # 5: Akita Inu


July 12, 2010
ann

Akita Inu: “Gin” from Silver Fang (1986)

This is a story of an Akita Inu pup called Gin (Japanese for “silver”) who leaves his owner, to join a pack of dogs. The pack gathers strong dogs from all over Japan to fight a deranged bear and his minions. The Japanese Cartoon: Silver Fang, was inspired by a news article which told of hunting dogs that had been abandoned by their masters and had begun living as wild animals…

Akita Inu:Gin

The dogs communicate with each other through speech, though it continues to be barks and whines to human ears. Other dogs from the film include: a German Shepherd, a Great Dane, A Weinmaraner, a Cocker Spaniel, a Japanese Kai Ken dog, a Rough Collie, a Siberian Husky, a Dachshund, a Japanese Tosa Inu fighting dog and a Japanese Kishu Inu dog. The Japanese Akita Inu has been declared a national treasure in Japan since 1931 and this breed was originally bred to fight, and hunt bears. No wonder an Akita Inu played the main character in this Japanese story that became famous all over the world.

Akita Inu: Gin

Akita Inu

Catgegory: Famous Dogs

Anti -Barking Dog Collars Versus Non Barking Dogs… ( Part 2 )


ann

Earlier this week, I tackled the topic of anti-barking dog collars; what they are; and how effective they are. I would like to continue with the topic a bit.

Although I briefly mentioned which breeds are the quiet representatives, I would like to continue with this thread. This is also an important factor when choosing a dog or a puppy. The amount of barking depends on three things: Firstly, the environment in which the dog lives influences his behaviour. Secondly it is genetic. Some dog breeds have been bred to be more quiet than others. Thirdly, canine physiology also holds answers. The Basenji breed for instance…ancient as it is, originates from Africa, and it has under-developed vocal cords. It cannot bark, because of a shallow larynx. It can give out sounds like yoddeling though. Some other more quiet breeds include:

-Golden Retrievers
-Newfoundland dogs
-Boxers
-Alaskan Malamutes
-Saint Bernards
-Bulldogs
-Collies
-Afghans

Of course they do bark, but in moderation. Dogs that are big barkers have well-developed vocal cords. New dog owners often don’t consider both training and dog breeds when selecting a dog and this can result in problems due to barking.
Barking Dogs and anti-barking dog collars

If you have done your research before buying a dog, good for you! An anti-barking dog collar is not needed if you are an owner of a quiet breed. Research into choosing a dog is imperative. However, if you are a loving owner of a rather roudy dog, then you may just have a problem there and an anti-barking dog collar in this case is a great possibility and solution. According to dog trainer and author; Ty Brown: ” I get tired of people who don’t do research and call these collars mean and cruel without realizing how humane they can be when used right. ” With an anti-barking dog collar, slowly but surely, your roudy dog can become a quiet pet as well; much like the other non-barking dog breeds.

Please do bear in mind that puppies tend to be more enthusiastic and loud. A lot depends on the individual personality of your dog as well. If your dog has spent his early weeks among very enthusiastic barking dogs, don’t expect him to be silent, no matter what the dog breed is. Regardless of which dog breed you end up choosing, don’t overlook the importance of good training. Good training – although often requiring extreme patience and professional help; combined with an anti-barking dog collar- will ensure a happy home environment for both dog and owner. Silence is Golden. Start with an anti-barking dog collar.

Catgegory: Dog Tips

Canine Love vs. Interior Design:


ann

While the love, affection and loyalty of a dog is so rewarding, clusters of dog hair and dried drool have a tendency to diminish the elegance of a damask chair. When you purchase furniture, rugs, and décor; dogs tend to play a part in the decision-making process. Here are some tips on caring for your dog-friendly home:

Upholstery: Performance fabrics, formerly used outdoors, have come indoors. Crypton Super Fabrics is one good example. Crypton offers a range of fabrics from washable twills to suede. Stain-resistant fabrics are good for slipcovers and upholstery as well. Take home fabric samples to see how dog hair attracts/blends/shows on a particular color. If you can’t get fabric that is covered in crypton, then spray your furniture with a furniture protectant that helps deter stains.

Fur-niture: Re-upholster an old chaise in doggy-paw patterned fabric which is theirs to snuggle on in the family room. Leather also cleans very easily and can be covered with blankets. You can put a large sheet over the couch that the dogs like to use so as to protect it from everyday use. When you have company, just fold up the sheet and stow it under the couch.

Couch demon

Carpets: Try to coordinate the colors of your carpets with the colors of your dogs so that the dog hair isn’t as noticeable. Although hardwood floors and tile may be easier to maintain, with a little common sense, a reliable vacuum cleaner and an arsenal of stain remover and deodorizer, you can enjoy your carpets and your pets. Keep a “paw towel” by the door to wipe your dogs’ paws when they come back from exploring. If you just don’t manage with the carpets, then consider going for laminated floors. Hard wooden floors scratch easily and are more expensive to replace.
Beds: Spread a throw on top of your bed, so as to keep the bed free of dog hair. Wash the throw regularly. White bedding is also a good idea, since it can be easily bleached.

Decorating versus Safe-proofing: Take breakable objects off of tabletops and low-lying shelves. Remove poisonous plants, lock up chemicals and organize wires and cables. It is also a good idea to install locks on low cabinets and add baby gates to any off-limits areas.

light fabric

Catgegory: Dog Tips

Canine Castaway: How A Modern Day Lassie Came Home


sandor.fagyal

One of the most heart-warming stories in the news this week has been of the incredible journey undertaken by an Australian dog. The dognamed Sophie Tucker after a famous US entertainer – had fallen overboard as its owners Jan and Dave Griffith sailed through a storm off the Queensland coast last November.
The distraught owners had thought they ha’d seen the last of their pet but – amazingly – four months later they were contacted by rangers who had found her on a desert island.

Sophie Tucker fell overboard

It turned out Sophie Tucker had swum five nautical miles to find safety on the island where she had lived on goats.
You can read a full version of the story – as well as an interview with the owners at the BBC News website. But this is far from the first incredible journey a dog has made.

In 1922 Science magazine reported on a one-year-old collie whose owners moved 160 miles from Canon City to Denver, Colorado. Within a week the dog was back at his old home, having crossed the Arkansas River and a mountain range including the giant Pike’s Peak. Perhaps even more amazingly, in 1994, a veterinary magazine reported how a Cocker Spaniel called Sadie safely returned to her home after losing her owner 45 miles away. What was remarkable about Sadie was the fact that she was blind.

Sadie’s story adds credence to the idea that dogs use their sense of smell to guide them home.
Many scientists think they encounter familiar odours from other dogs they have been in contact with and whose “home range” overlaps with theirs. They then calculate the right direction in which to head based on this information.

For more odd and interesting scientific facts about man’s best friend you should read ‘Play It Again Tom: Curious Truths About Cats And Dogs’ by Augustus Brown.

Lassie the Male Dog!


sandor.fagyal

Everyone knows “Lassie”. The famous Collie initially published by Eric Knight in 1938. For generations, Lassie (a female collie) has enthralled audiences ranging from Children to senior citizens.

In fact, she has been portrayed in Books, Television (Both Movies and TV Shows) and even radio shows. Described as “Mahogany and Sable” in color, story follows Lassie as she strives to return home to the boy she grew up with.

Lassie

However, it is a little known fact that all the Lassies that have been portrayed in Movies are male! Apparently, the males “Look better”, and have thicker coats. In addition, they are also slightly bigger than the females making it easier for a child to act alongside for a long time without rapidly outgrowing the dog.

Guess looks are deceiving huh? You can’t do that with humans!

Catgegory: Dog Facts|Famous Dogs