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Anti-Barking Dog Collars Versus Non Barking Dogs…( Part 1)


July 12, 2010
ann

All dogs bark. Is that true? Well no. Not all dogs bark, but most do. Owners of a Basenji, an Alaskan Malamute, and an Afghan Hound can take it easy and enjoy the silence around them. However there are dogs that are typically big barkers and these include the Jack Russell, Yorkshire Terrier, Maltese, Mudi, Vizsla, Shetland Dog, Newfoundland, German Shepherd, Dachshund, Beagle, West-Highland Terrier, Toy Poodle, Doberman and the Schnauzer.

So what to do when you have to listen to incessant barking? Not only your sleep, but your neighbors’ nerves will also be affected. Although one understands that barking is natural for dogs, there comes a time when enough is enough. What to do then? Training might help…but an anti-barking dog collar might do the trick as well.

What is an anti-barking dog collar you ask? Well this is special type of collar that triggers a reaction out of a dog…and after repetitively negatively stimulating the dog with every bark, the dog slowly but surely learns not to bark. There are different types of anti bark collars available. There are dog collars that deliver a light shock to your dog as a reaction to barking. There is also a type of dog collar that sprays mists of citronella. This smell is not welcomed by dogs and they sooner stop barking than continue smelling the fumes of citronella around them. This is a more humane solution because it does not inflict pain to the dog.

Anti-Barking Collar for Dogs

So how effective is an anti barking dog collar, you ask?

Catgegory: Dog Tips

Can Ear Cropping and Tail Docking of Dogs Be Compared To Breast Implants in Humans?


July 12, 2010
ann

Tell me…do women look better with breast implants? You are probably thinking “what the hell does silicone have to do with dogs?” Not much, I agree, but as an analogy, it is striking. Today I was walking in a shopping mall and saw a woman with “fake boobs”. My train of thought steamed ahead of me and I found myself thinking: “Hey! This is much like cropping a dog’s ears or docking its tail! So….I would like to talk about docking and cropping. (At the end, feel free to answer my initial question, if you feel like it, of course)

Much like with silicone implants, tail docking and ear cropping have been met by a lot of opposition. The tradition first originates from selecting breeding practices and it is seen as cosmetic modification of that which is God-given.

So let me start by explaining what ear cropping is. At about age 9-13 weeks, puppies go under the knife and their whole look changes. While the puppy is anesthetized the outside edge of the puppy’s ears are cropped. The cuts are sutured closed and the ears are placed in a rack so that they stand up, while they heal. Breeds that undergo this procedure include the American Staffordshire Terrier, American Pit Bull Terrier, Staffordshire Bull Terrier, Schnauzer, Boxer, Great Dane, and Doberman Pinscher. Cropping was originally done on fighting dogs…to decrease their chances of having an injured ear. On hunting dogs it was also done, but in this case it was done, so that they wouldn’t get tangled in the bushes. Now the main question arises: Is it good to have this procedure done? Well, I have to be honest with you; I like the look of a hardcore Great Dane with cropped ears….or the sleek look of a Doberman with cropped ears. But…- and yes, there is always a but – ….Cropping is no longer necessary. Dog fights have been banned and working dogs have become more family dogs.

cropped ears versus uncropped ears in dogs

Tail docking on the other hand, is a procedure that is done when the puppy is only days old.

Catgegory: Dog Facts

Why Do Dogs' Eyes Glow in the Dark?


July 12, 2010
ann

You have most probably seen that your dog’s eyes glow at night, like flourescent globes. Ever wonder why they do that? Well it has a rather simple scientific explanation. Dogs have a mirror-like layer of cells called the tapetum lucidum (bright carpet in Latin) at the back of their eyes. Humans do not possess these cells. The job of these cells is to improve a dog’s vision in dim light. It achieves this by reflecting light back to the retina. The more light the retina receives the more information it has to work with to translate that light into images. So when you see your dog’s eyes as glowing spheres in the dark, what you’re actually seeing is light being reflected by the tapetum lucidum cells, so that images can be formed. Otherwise, without these cells, dogs would be unable to see at night. The eyes of many animals -including dogs – will also reflect yellow, green, or other colors in flash photography as well. It is called the “green-eye effect” or the “green eyeshine” in animals. In humans on the other hand, the opposite “red-eye effect” is a problem because, with no tapetum lucidum layer to block the light, it reaches the blood-rich region at the back of the eye and causes a brilliant red image of it to be focused back through the lens of the eye, giving even the nicest people red, glowing, demonic eyes in flash photographs.

doberman with glowing eyes

Catgegory: Dog Facts

World's Best Tracker Dog:


July 12, 2010
ann

The best tracker was recorded in 1925, and the record is still held by the Doberman Pinscher named “Sauer”, trained by Detective-Sergeant Herbert Kruger. Sauer tracked a stock thief 100 miles (161 km) across the vast Great Karroo, in South Africa by scent alone. Did you know that a man named Louis Doberman, a German tax-collector, first bred the Doberman breed in the late 1860s to protect him while he worked?

Two stunning Dobermans…

Doberman Pinschers

Catgegory: Dog Facts

Dog Art: Doberman Pinscher Paintings


July 12, 2010
ann

Artist, Sarah Theophilus’ distinctive style as well as her passion for dogs take the contemporary approach to the tradition of pet portraits much further. Her dog paintings capture the candid, the intense, and the more quirky nature of our beloved companions. Her art can be seen at Pet Portraits in Pastel.

Toby, the Doberman

The Doberman Pinscher, also called the Dobermann in many countries or just simply Doberman, is a popular breed of dog that originates from Germany. Dobermans are among the most popular of pet breeds, and the breed is well known for its intelligence, alertness and loyalty as a companion dog. Although in the 1970’s-1980’s, it was used more as a guard dog, a watch dog, or as a police dog, this is less common today. In many countries, Doberman Pinschers are one of the most recognizable breeds, in part because of their actual roles in society, and in part because of media stereotyping them as viscious creatures. Although they can be assertive, careful breeding and care has improved the temperament of this breed, and the modern Doberman Pinscher is an energetic and lively breed which is ideally suited for companionship and family life, making any family proud. Anyone who has ever owned a Doberman, can vouch for this fact!

Catgegory: Dog Art

Learn More about Military Dogs


July 12, 2010
Sandor Fagyal

Military dogs are dogs that are used to complement the various tasks that are needed to carry out a military operations. To some, this may seem to be contrary to humanitarian principles. But I look at it like this – This is how dogs first evolved – as a companion in hunting, and in fact, gun dogs like the Hungarian Vizsla are in use by even non military personnel.

Military Dog Training

 

 

Catgegory: Company News