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How to Choose an English Bulldog


July 12, 2010
Sandor Fagyal

More so with this breed than others, there is a vast difference in quality, and unfortunately there are a lot of not so good looking Bulldogs out there. To help your important decision, we’ve complied this guide.

WHO IS SUITED TO THIS BREED?

The English bulldog, the pride and symbol of Brittan. Nowadays, a great companion with a gentle/docile demeanour, but a few centuries ago it was bred for Bull baiting and a very rugged and tough customer indeed. This aggressiveness has thankfully now been bred out, and the Bulldog has become more appealing on the eye, especially for the show ring. Unfortunately, this breeding has caused health problems, which makes it not an easy nor cheap breed to own and always some money is needed to be set aside for vet consultations (cherry eye, skin problems, dysplasia issues, patella luxations…). What I am saying here is that it is probably not suited to those on a tight budget. Bulldogs do not need a great deal of exercise especially as they get older (they can be very playful as pups), so suited to lazy indoor coach potato lifestyle such as in an apartment. Elderly people like them for this and may just take them for one leisurely stroll once a day around the block or let them play in a small yard for a bit. A little downside to this inside living is that they can be messy eaters and snore. With considerate kids Bulldogs are great, so make excellent family companions. Bulldogs are best suited to temperate climates and not very hot/humid weather where they can overheat fast, especially if expected to run or walk in it. If looking for a “lifetime companion” you should note that this breed on average lives til only 7-10 years. Bullies range from 600 – 6000 USD upwards. We do suggest you go for quality and not price as what you save in price at the beginning, you may make up for in vet visits later if you catch my drift (we do not suggest to go under 1500 USD for your Bully). This is one breed you must truly have a passion for to appreciate it and spend quality time with. It thrives on human attention.

MALE OR FEMALE

Usually, this breed gets on well with other dogs whether male or female. Sometimes can be a little scrappy with strange dogs, but the secret here is good early socialization in the puppy hood. Males are going to be bigger/grander and will show the true Bulldog traits more, which is a big draw card for some. On the other hand, females are likely to be a little more relaxed and cleaner as they do not mark their territory with sent everywhere.

English Bulldog

COLOUR AND SIZE

Brindle
White (can be patched/pied with this list of colours too as the adult above)
Light fawn through to a rich red (can have white markings as the below pictured pup)
Black (not usually kennel club accepted, but people like it because it is rare and unique)

The average size for a Bulldog adult is around 23–27 kg (50-60 lbs). Although not so high of the ground (31-36 cm) it should be classed as a medium sized breed, so if you wanted a small dog, it might not be the one for you. It’s not a bad idea to keep around the average and make sure you at least see photos and know the weights of the parents before your purchase. There is also a new hype called the Miniature Bulldog (same look, just bred smaller but not mixed) and the weight is ranging from 11–18 kg (25-40 lbs).

CONFORMATION OVER COLOUR!

Conformation (shape) is sadly often overlooked and colour/markings takes precedence, which is wrong and should only play a part if 2 dogs are similar in build and you have to choose between them! On the contrary to the bow legged cartoon Bulldog in Tom and Jerry, the legs should be straight and set wide apart by the chest and shoulders. Facial wrinkles are great but can mean more health issues as cherry eye and extra work cleaning between them to avoid skin irritations. These furrows are not always favoured by show judges either. A flat/squashed nose with one big thick hotdog nose rope is a real trademark of the breed, along with a massive square head. The body should be stocky, with a low to the ground profile, supported by dense bones (fore and hind legs) as thick as tree trunks so to speak. Also look for some loose folds of skin as easily seen on the gorgeous puppy below. A short bun-looking tail is usually preferred, to a longer one as Bulldogs often can have. A useful tip to judge conformation is to start at the head and work your way along the body. Although a young puppy is changing fast, these are early traits to look for, as likely to be carried through.

English Bulldog Puppy

It’s worth noting that there is a tendency that the best ones come from Europe and from European lines. Please feel free to contact Euro Puppy to ask us questions and check out our quality English Bulldog puppies for sale.

Do feel free to leave any comments and your thoughts on this article? Since there is so much to write about this breed, a 2nd part is coming soon.

Catgegory: Dog Tips

How to choose a puppy? Look at the Adult Dog, Not the Puppy!


Sandor Fagyal

All too often, choices of what dog to buy are based on seeing a puppy picture. The puppy wins over your heart, and your hand steals to your wallet.

But wait! Remember that ALL puppies are cute, and while puppies are a delight to be with, remember that when they grow up, they will lose all their puppy qualities and take over the mantle of the breed they belong to. The puppy you are about to buy will resemble to one or both of the parents. If that is what you want GO FOR IT!

Adult and Puppy

Your choice of dog should depend on many factors including what sort of dog you finally want – large, hairy, playful, aggressive, and whether or not you are ready for one.

Look at your house, your surrounding, your family and your future plans before deciding to commit to a dog which is no less of a responsibility than a baby.

For puppy and adult photos please visit Euro Puppy.

Catgegory: Dog Tips
1

How to Choose your Dogue de Bordeaux!


Sandor Fagyal

Many of you may have seen the the sloppy star of an American film named Turner and Hooch, which had Tom Hanks in it. Well, I can tell you that not until this film came out, did this breed attain much recognition outside of France where it originated from many centuries ago (hence its other name, French Mastiff and the region it’s from, Bordeaux). The below information is a guide to help you make an informed decision if seriously contemplating owning this breed.

Who is suited to this breed?

This breed was first used guarding and believe it or not, game hunting, dog fighting and animal baiting. Today this breed is still used for guarding, but more so companionship as is extremely loyal, patient and devoted to those that are close. It does not need so much exercise (A daily walk and a bit of light play is usually sufficient as it’s a heavy breed) and not so athletic, but its messy eating manners, drooling and large size make it a difficult, but not impossible dog to keep inside a home. Ideally a small yard is better suited to it and non-extreme hot and cold weather conditions. A Dogue de Bordeaux can posses formidable traits, such as relentless strength, wariness of strangers and an inclination to intimidate unknown people. This makes it a first class watchdog and has natural instinct from a young age. It is suited to an owner that is prepared to spend plenty of quality time, and has a real enthusiasm for this large, fast learning and impressive looking breed. It is often said for good reason, that this breed is best in the hands of an experienced owner.

Male or female?

This breed can be aggressive to other dogs especially males. A dominant alpha male can be a hard nut to crack. Neutering can settle it down somewhat but may not solve all problems. The French Mastiff needs early socialization and obedience training is recommended whether male or female to alleviate future problems. This is very important! A shy or reserved Mastiff due to lack of socialization could be a big mistake. Many owners will find a female DDB cleaner (not marking its territory on every available occasion) and easier to handle with a more relaxed/submissive disposition. This would make for a possible better family choice, while the male as a courageous guardian. The male being noticeably bigger as a rule, highlights better the true DDB traits, which is a big draw card for some. Some males may even get up to 75kg (165 lbs) as big, lion-hearted and looking Carlo below!

Dogue de Bordeaux

Colors

French Mastiffs come in several shades of fawn from light to dark. They can often be described as red and rust, and the deeper, richer the color, the most desired usually. However, some people prefer light fawn, and this shade should not be overlooked if other traits are positive. Solid color is popular, but there can be white on the tips of their toes and a patch on the chest, nowhere else. Many people like this also, so it’s just a matter of personal preference of course.

Conformation

Often conformation (shape) is overlooked and color and markings take preference. However, conformation is very important and here are some traits to notice when buying your puppy (Although changing fast at a young age, these early traits are likely to be carried through). Good puppies usually have plenty of facial wrinkle on a large proportioned head and some loose skin on the body. A downside to this wrinkle is that more care and cleaning is required by the owner as it can lead to problems such as skin infection. A short, furrowed muzzle on a puppy is an important factor to look for along with a dense/thick bone structure and deep chest. Being a large breed, it should take a rectangular shape, but not to be as long as a train so to speak. Many people look for large feet as an omen for big things to come. Early large size can also have a downside as too much weight on the legs and hips at this important growing stage can lead to problems such as dysplacia later (HD/ED). Seeing both parents (dam and especially sire) is beneficial as they will give good foresight to how your puppy will look fully grown. Below is a pup that illustrates many of the important characteristics to look for. As a guide, Just start at the head and then work your way over the bone structure.

Dogue de Bordeaux puppy

People will buy this breed to show, guard, breed or just as a family pet. Regardless of purpose, it pays to get a Dogue de Bordeaux true to the breed standards and attractive. This is one breed where there is a vast difference between top and bottom shelf and there is no shortage of not so good looking dogs out there unfortunately. It is neither a cheap dog to buy (1800 USD upwards usually) nor care for. There is a tendency that the best ones come from Europe or have strong European heritage.

I hope this helps your decision? If still unsure, have questions or ready to get your dog, contact an expert at Euro Puppy and check out our Dogue de Bordeaux puppies for sale!

Catgegory: Dog Tips

How to Choose your Neapolitan Mastiff!


Sandor Fagyal

Okay, you’re seriously thinking about buying a Neapolitan Mastiff, but before you do, you might want to take some of the following points into consideration to make sure you get the one that is the most suitable for you. After all, it’s a big decision, and the better informed you are, the easier the choice.

Who is suited to this breed?

This breeds originates from Italy a very long time ago (Antiquity) and was first used for dog fighting and livestock guarding. Today this Mastino is mainly used for companionship and security. It does not need frequent exercise and not so athletic, but its messy eating manners, drooling and sheer size make it a difficult dog to keep inside a home. It is better suited to a small yard with an adequate doghouse or property such as a place to protect as it is excellent at this task (you may not find much better). It is suited to an owner that is prepared to spend plenty of quality time, and has a real enthusiasm for this large, intelligent and beautiful breed. It is often said for good reason, that this breed is best in the hands of experienced dog handlers.

Male or female?

This breed can be dominant and this especially applies to males! A dominant alpha male can be very tough case indeed. Neutering can settle it down somewhat but may not solve all problems. The Neapolitan Mastiff needs early socialization and obedience training whether male or female to alleviate future problems. This is very important! Many owners will find a female Neo cleaner (not marking its territory on every available occasion) and easier to handle with a more relaxed/submissive disposition. This would make for a possible better family choice, while the male as a courageous guardian. The male being noticeably bigger as a rule, highlights better the true Neo traits, which is a big draw card for some. Some males may get up to 90kg (200lbs) as big Marco below.

Neapolitan Mastiff

Colors

Basically it is just a matter of personal choice. Often there can be white on the tips of their toes and a patch on the chest.

-Blue (often referred to as grey and the most common and popular color)
-Black
-Brown (known as tawny or mahogany. Very rare and more expensive)

These colors can have some brindle through them also, where the coat is streaked, not a solid color.

Conformation

Often conformation (shape) is overlooked and color and markings take preference. However, conformation is very important and here are some traits to notice when buying your puppy (Although changing fast at a young age, these early traits are likely to be carried through). Good puppies usually have plenty of facial wrinkle on a large head and loose skin on the body, especially around the neck and chest area. A downside to this wrinkle is that more care and cleaning is required by the owner and it can lead to problems such as cherry eye (the eye tissue protrudes more than normal and becomes red and inflamed). A short muzzle on a puppy is an important factor to look for along with a dense/thick bone structure. Being a large breed, it should take a rectangular shape, but not to be as long as a train so to speak. Many people look for large feet as an omen for big things to come. Early large size can also have a downside as too much weight on the legs and hips at this important growing stage can lead to problems such as dysplacia later (HD/ED). Below is a blue pup that illustrates many of the characteristics to look for.

Neaplitan Mastiff Puppy

People will buy this breed to show, guard, breed or just as a family pet. Regardless of purpose, it pays to get a Neo true to the breed standards and attractive. This is one breed where there is quite a difference between top and bottom shelf and there is no shortage of not so good looking dogs out there unfortunately. It is neither a cheap dog to buy nor care for. There is a tendency that the best ones come from Europe or have strong European heritage.

I hope this helps your decision? If still unsure or ready to get your dog, Contact Euro Puppy and check out our Neapolitan Mastiff puppies for sale!

Catgegory: Dog Tips

How to Choose your French Bulldog!


Sandor Fagyal

Okay, you’re seriously thinking about buying a French Bulldog. But just before you do, you might want to take some of the following points into consideration to make sure you get the one that is the most suitable for you. After all, it’s a big decision, and the better informed you are, the easier the choice.

Male or female?
Men are from Mars and Women from Venus, the gender issue. Although usually clownish and sweet, this breed can exhibit same-sex aggression. This is more likely to be with 2 intact and full-blooded males, but not totally limited to them. If you already have a male in the household you may think of getting a female, especially if he is a little dominant. This makes it not easy, but early socialization in the puppyhood will help to alleviate future problems whichever sex you decide on. Of course if there is a female and the male unneutered, you may have to keep them apart for certain times of the year if you catch my drift. As you know or will learn quickly, turn your back on them and they will take full advantage of the situation (Frenchies are opportunists).

Generally, males (even more so if intact) are a little more rambunctious than females. This suits many people as could be argued as having more character and get up and go. They are also considered as being nicer in look as the typical French bulldog traits are more pronounced (you will read more about this below). Females, on the other hand don’t cock their leg on every 2nd upright thing to mark their territory and often people find them cleaner and sweeter in character.

French Bulldog Colors!
Frenchies are getting rather colorful these days. There is
– black
– brindle
– white
– cream
– fawn
– chocolate
– blue
– pied. Pied means having patches of a certain colors, such as: brindle pied, fawn pied.

Fawn Pied French Bulldog
Here is Daisy, a beautiful fawn pied for example.

Brindle dogs are said to be the healthiest, while pure white more likely to have problems (sensitive skin and deafness). Fawn is probably the most common. Black is usually not accepted if you’d like to show, there should be a little brindle in there (the coat is streaked instead of a solid color). If you’d like a French Bulldog in an unusual/rare color such as blue or chocolate, keep in mind that you may not be able to get one immediately and will be more expensive. In addition these are not recognized colors by FCI or AKC.

Conformation
Lastly, I’d like to touch on a few important conformation qualities to look out for when buying this breed. Look for compactness! What I mean by this is that the back should be short and not like a locomotive train. The legs should not be like a fashion models, but rather stocky instead. A useful tip is that the back line and the legs should be about the same length forming a square box as the below picture illustrates. Note also that this pup has a very nice deep chest.

Fawn French Bulldog
Back line and the legs are forming a square box.

Look for a large square head in comparison to the body even in a pup. A flat and wrinkly muzzle is also a must. Although changing fast while a puppy, these are early traits to notice as likely to be carried through. Being lean yet muscular is also an important factor but this will be seen more so on a quality adult male more of obvious reasons.

Pied Frenchie Head
Square head with the large bat ears.

Frenchies are known for their distinct “bat ears” People usually like them as large as possible and standing to attention as on this 12 week old pup. Sometimes the ears will take a little time to be strong enough stay up on some puppies (late developers).

I hope this helps your decision? If still unsure or ready to get your Frenchie Contact EP and check out our French bulldog puppies for sale!

Do you want to learn more? Send us your questions!

Catgegory: Dog Tips