Okay, you’re seriously thinking about buying a Neapolitan Mastiff, but before you do, you might want to take some of the following points into consideration to make sure you get the one that is the most suitable for you. After all, it’s a big decision, and the better informed you are, the easier the choice. Who is suited to this breed? This breeds originates from Italy a very long time ago (Antiquity) and was first used for dog fighting and livestock guarding. Today this Mastino is mainly used for companionship and security. It does not need frequent exercise and not so athletic, but its messy eating manners, drooling and sheer size make it a difficult dog to keep inside a home. It is better suited to a small yard with an adequate doghouse or property such as a place to protect as it is excellent at this task (you may not find much better). It is suited to an owner that is prepared to spend plenty of quality time, and has a real enthusiasm for this large, intelligent and beautiful breed. It is often said for good reason, that this breed is best in the hands of experienced dog handlers. Male or female? This breed can be dominant and this especially applies to males! A dominant alpha male can be very tough case indeed. Neutering can settle it down somewhat but may not solve all problems. The Neapolitan Mastiff needs early socialization and obedience training whether male or female to alleviate future problems. This is very important! Many owners will find a female Neo cleaner (not marking its territory on every available occasion) and easier to handle with a more relaxed/submissive disposition. This would make for a possible better family choice, while the male as a courageous guardian. The male being noticeably bigger as a rule, highlights better the true Neo traits, which is a big draw card for some. Some males may get up to 90kg (200lbs) as big Marco below.
Neapolitan Mastiff
Colors Basically it is just a matter of personal choice. Often there can be white on the tips of their toes and a patch on the chest. -Blue (often referred to as grey and the most common and popular color) -Black -Brown (known as tawny or mahogany. Very rare and more expensive) These colors can have some brindle through them also, where the coat is streaked, not a solid color. Conformation Often conformation (shape) is overlooked and color and markings take preference. However, conformation is very important and here are some traits to notice when buying your puppy (Although changing fast at a young age, these early traits are likely to be carried through). Good puppies usually have plenty of facial wrinkle on a large head and loose skin on the body, especially around the neck and chest area. A downside to this wrinkle is that more care and cleaning is required by the owner and it can lead to problems such as cherry eye (the eye tissue protrudes more than normal and becomes red and inflamed). A short muzzle on a puppy is an important factor to look for along with a dense/thick bone structure. Being a large breed, it should take a rectangular shape, but not to be as long as a train so to speak. Many people look for large feet as an omen for big things to come. Early large size can also have a downside as too much weight on the legs and hips at this important growing stage can lead to problems such as dysplacia later (HD/ED). Below is a blue pup that illustrates many of the characteristics to look for.
Neaplitan Mastiff Puppy
People will buy this breed to show, guard, breed or just as a family pet. Regardless of purpose, it pays to get a Neo true to the breed standards and attractive. This is one breed where there is quite a difference between top and bottom shelf and there is no shortage of not so good looking dogs out there unfortunately. It is neither a cheap dog to buy nor care for. There is a tendency that the best ones come from Europe or have strong European heritage. I hope this helps your decision? If still unsure or ready to get your dog, Contact Euro Puppy and check out our Neapolitan Mastiff puppies for sale!